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Category: Planet Ubuntu

A new adventure awaits

This September 15th, my Ubuntu Membership will turn six years old. I’ve been with the community for a long time now (not as long as others!), and I’ve learned a lot along the way. So far, I have only done volunteer work, and, a couple months ago, I decided I needed to take the next step. Now that I’m 20, I need to find a real job.

After searching for a while, the hunt ended up being fruitful. As of September 1st, I will start working with Hiperderecho, a Peruvian NGO. In short, Hiperderecho loves that everyone can enjoy the Internet freely, and promotes and defends digital rights and freedoms. I will be joining them as their Director of Community, and can’t be more happy that an opportunity such as this one has popped up.

No, I won’t stop studying (yes, I’m still in school). No, I won’t stop contributing to the Ubuntu community. In fact, I will be at SeaGL, giving a talk about how worldwide communities interact with each other, as well as helping run the Ubuntu booth. If you’re in the area, come by and say hi!

And that’s all from me now. I’m sure this will be an opportunity for learning and growing both personally and professionally, and can’t wait to start!

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The SeaGL 2017 Call for Papers is now open!

Are you from the US Northwest area? Have something cool to tell or show from the open source world? Then you should apply to give a talk at SeaGL this year!

SeaGL is a grassroots technical conference, taking place in Seattle, WA, United States in October 6-7th. It’s dedicated to spreading knowledge about the GNU/Linux community and free/libre/open-source software/hardware. I went last year, and there’s a lot of cool people with amazing stories on multiple open source topics. Now, we want to hear from you.

I’m sure there’s a lot of you with cool projects that you want to share with the world. Go ahead! This fourth year there’s 20-minute talks, where you can give a quick introduction to your piece of software/hardware, or 50-minute talks, where you can do a demo, and go in-depth about your project. Is it going to be your first talk ever? SeaGL is a great place to get started! Have questions about your talk proposal? They have weekly office hours in the #seagl channel on freenode to give you a hand!

Conferences like SeaGL are powered by their own attendees, so it’d be great to see new faces around showing off amazing stuff. I hope to see many new names on the schedule, as well as some other familiar ones.  Propose a talk, and hopefully, I’ll see you in October! And hurry – CFP closes on August 6th, midnight PDT.

Announcing UbuCon Latin America 2017

It’s my pleasure to announce UbuCon Latin America 2017! For a third consecutive year, we’ll be holding it at the University of Lima, Peru. This year’s conference will take place August 18-19th.

UbuCon Latin America is a conference where people from LatAm and the rest of the world get together to discuss the state of the art of Ubuntu, as well as cool things you can do with it. We are planning on two days full of Ubuntu topics!

Travel and accommodation information can be found here.

We would also like you to participate. If you have a talk you’d like to present, please fill out the call for papers. It will only be open for a couple weeks. After that, we’ll be publishing our schedule.

Would you like to sponsor UbuCon Latin America this year? Send an email to jose@ubuntu.com and we’ll get back in touch!

I hope to see you all in Lima, Peru in just a couple months!

Social Media Management vs. Community Management?

I personally stopped blogging a while ago, but I kinda feel this is a necessary blog post. A while ago, a professor used the term Community Manager interchangeably with Social Media Manager. I made a quick comment about them not being the same, and later some friends started questioning my reasoning.

Last week during OSCON, I was chatting with a friend about this same topic. A startup asked me to help them as a community manager about a year ago. I gladly accepted, but then they just started assigning me social media work.

And these are not the only cases. I have seen several people use both terms interchangeably, which they are not. I guess it’s time for me to burst the bubble that has been wrapped around both terms.

In order to do that, let’s explain, in very simple words, the job of both of them. Let’s start with the social media managers. Their job is, as the title says, to manage social media channels. Post on Facebook, respond to Twitter replies, make sure people feel welcome when they visit any of the social media channels, and automatically represent the brand/product through social media.

Community managers, on the other side, focus on building communities around a product or service. To put it simpler, they make sure that there’s people that care about the product, that contribute to the ecosystem, that work with the provider to make it better. Social media management is a part of their job. It is a core function, because it is one of the channels that allow them to communicate with people to hear their concerns and project the provider’s voice about the product. However, it is not their only job. They also have to go out and meet with people, in real life. Talk with higher-ups to voice the concerns. Hear how the product is impacting people’s life in order to make a change, or continue on the same good path.

With this, I’m not trying to devalue the work of social media managers. On the other hand, they are have a very valuable job. Imagine all those companies with social media profiles, without the funny comments. No message replies if you had a question. Horrible, right? Managing these channels is as important, so brands/products are ‘alive’ on the interwebs. Being a community manager is not only managing a channel. Therefore, they are not comparable jobs.

Each of the positions is different, even though they complement each other pretty well. But I hope that with this post you can understand a little bit more about the inside job of both community managers and social media managers. In a fast-paced world like ours today, these two can make a huge difference between having a presence online, or not. So, next time, if you’re looking for a community manager, don’t expect them to do only social media work. And viceversa – if you’re looking for a social media manager, don’t expect them to build community out of social media.

Ubuntu Conferences in November

Hey everyone!

And here I am, packing to go in yet another adventure. If you are near the Seattle area, I encourage you to go to SeaGl, a volunteer-ran conference. I will be speaking about Juju, and we’ll also have an Ubuntu table!

On the other hand, I will also be at UbuCon Europe. If you are in Germany, make sure to attend!

If you are going to be at any of those conferences, make sure to come by and say hi – I’d love to see you.

Time to jump on a plane!

Ubuntu and Juju at Ohio Linux Fest this weekend!

Hey everyone! Just a quick announcement that Ubuntu and Juju will be at Ohio Linux Fest this weekend. The event takes place at the Hyatt Regency Columbus, in Columbus, OH on Friday and Saturday. If you can drop by, please say hi!

I will be giving a talk about Juju on Saturday at 3pm. Ubuntu will be running a table as well. If you are going to be attending the event, please drop by the table. We’ll have some Ubuntu phones for demo, I can help you with Juju stuff, and some other community members will be there as well. If you have an Official Ubuntu Book, 9th Edition, I’d be happy to sign it for you. Elizabeth K. Joseph is going to be at the event as well, so you can get signatures from two different authors!

If you want to volunteer at the Ubuntu table we’ll be having, please drop me an email to jose@ubuntu.com. Otherwise, come by, we can grab a coffee or dinner after the event. Looking forward to seeing you soon!

Juju Client Now Works Properly On All Linuxes!

Hello everyone! This is a guest post by Menno Smits, who works on the Juju team. He originally announced this great news in the Juju mailing list (which you should all subscribe to!), and I thought it was definitely worth to announce in the Planet. Stay tuned to the mailing list for more great announcements, which I feel are going to come now that we are moving to RCs of Juju 2.0.

Juju 2.0 is just around the corner and there’s so much great stuff in the release. It really is streets ahead of the 1.x series.

One improvement that’s recently landed is that the Juju client will now work on any Linux distribution. Up until now, the client hasn’t been usable on variants of Linux for which Juju didn’t have explicit support (Ubuntu and CentOS). This has now been fixed – the client will now work on any Linux distribution. Testing has been done with Fedora, Debian and Arch, but any Linux distribution should now be OK to use.

It’s worth noting that when using local Juju binaries (i.e. a `juju` and `jujud` which you’ve built yourself or that someone has sent you), checks in the `juju bootstrap` command have been relaxed. This way, a Juju client running on any Linux flavour can bootstrap a controller running any of the supported Ubuntu series. Previously, it wasn’t possible for a client running a non-Ubuntu distribution to bootstrap a Juju controller using local Juju binaries.

All this is great news for people who are wanting to get started with Juju but are not running Ubuntu on their workstations. These changes will be available in the Juju 2.0 rc1 release.

And we’re back with UbuCon Latin America 2016!

I promised we’d be back, and here we are! Took us just a couple months to get things up and rolling, but UbuCon Latin America is now being organized. This year, we decided we’ll be hosting it in Lima, Peru again, on the 5-6th August!

We have now opened the Call for Papers for the conference. If you are willing to speak at UbuConLA, just fill out this form. Also, if you have any talk suggestions send us an email to info@ubuconla.org. We’ll be more than happy to see if we can get a talk in on the topic you’re interested.

On the other hand, we are looking for sponsors! If you or someone you know is interested in sponsoring our event, feel free to drop us an email to sponsors@ubuconla.org. We’ll be more than happy to answer all your questions about sponsorship, so email us anytime.

Registration for the conference will open soon, so stay tuned!

Ubuntu’s back at OSCON this year!

You read it right! After several years of being absent, Ubuntu is going to be present at OSCON this 2016. We are going to be there as a non-profit, so make sure you visit us at booth 631-3.

It has been several years since we had a presence as exhibitors, and I am glad to say we’re going to have awesome things this year. It’s also OSCON’s first year at Austin. New year, new venue! But getting to the point,  we will have:

  • System76 laptops so you can play and experience with Ubuntu Desktop
  • A couple Nexus 4 phones, so you can try out Ubuntu Touch
  • A bq M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet so you can see how beautiful it is, and see convergence in action (thanks Popey!)
  • A Mycroft! (Thanks to the Mycroft guys, can’t wait to see one in person myself!)
  • Some swag for free (first come-first serve basis, make sure to drop by!)
  • And a raffle for the Official Ubuntu Book, 8th Edition!

The conference starts Monday the 16th May (tomorrow!) but the Expo Hall opens on Tuesday night. You could say we start on Wednesday 🙂 If you are going to be there, don’t forget to drop by and say hi. It’s my first time at OSCON, so we’ll see how the conference is. I am pretty excited about it – hope to see several of you there!

Let’s Code-In!

A while ago I got an email saying that organization registration is now open for the Google Code-In contest. For those of you who don’t know what it is, it consists on a list of tasks provided by different open source organizations, from which high school students can pick any and help the organization. The students whose work outstands, they will be taken to the Googleplex for a tour and some more neat stuff. Why am I telling you all of this, you ask? Because I would like Ubuntu to be a part of the contest this year!

In order to participate as an organization, we need to register by Wednesday (already tomorrow in some parts of the world!) and make sure we can provide between 150 and 500 tasks. However, I can not do this on my own. We need a team of people willing to provide tasks for the students.

Now, think of it this way. We are going to be able to harvest new contributors, help them get involved with open source, and build a new generation of Ubuntu contributors, even Ubuntu Members.

If your team or project inside Ubuntu could use a hand, please do not hesitate on contacting me for more information on how to become a mentor. Or even better, if you want to help organize things for GCI, drop me a line! My email address is jose ubuntu com, or you can find me as jose on freenode. Ah, and if you want to take a look at the discussion we’ve been having, you can check the ubuntu-community-team mailing list thread. Oh, and if you have any questions at all, I’ll be more than happy to answer those too 🙂

I definitely hope to count with you all in this upcoming project, and that we get accepted as an organization. Can’t see anything but great things coming from the project!