Need help rooting or flashing your Nexus device? The solution is here!

by José Antonio Rey

A couple days ago, Android 4.4.3 was released. I have a Nexus device, so I was waiting for the OTA update. I had the 4.4.2 update on the queue, though, so I decided to go ahead and apply it. But my recovery partition had the TeamWin Recovery installed, which didn’t like the upgrade. So, I asked a friend of mine and he ended up giving me a simple solution for my flashing and rooting problems: Nexulockr.

Nexulockr is a program written by Ian Santopietro, which makes the task of managing your Nexus device (in terms of the previously mentioned stuff) way too easy. So, I went ahead and downloaded the Android 4.4.3 factory image for my device, and patiently waited. Well, I couldn’t expect to download it quickly with this 400 KB/s connection. While I did, the new Nexulockr version finished uploading, and I was getting ready to add the PPA to my machine. Doing it is as simple as executing the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nexulockr-dev/nexulockr-beta
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nexulockr

That, after another bit of waiting, installed Nexulockr into my machine. And I was ready to go! I opened the program and this magic screen appeared (with all my device info, of course):

Screenshot from 2014-06-04 21:54:36

The process of flashing the image was super quick and easy. I just clicked on the right button, and this other window appeared:

Screenshot from 2014-06-04 21:58:53

In the factory image I downloaded, I got lots of .img files compressed into one gzip. Problem is, sometimes you don’t know what image to flash first or last. Nexulockr solves this problem by having the buttons in the order the images need to be flashed. I went ahead and started flashing the images. No additional efforts were needed on my side, just selecting the image and clicking that automagic button while my phone was connected.

The next day, I found out my root had disappeared (for obvious reasons), so I had to root my phone again. Guess what – Nexulockr also helped me with that. I went ahead, connected my phone, and clicked the “Root” button. I selected “Root device” and I just had to do one press on my phone to confirm the root. And that was it. No tedious command line interaction!

The developer states that Nexulockr may work with some other devices, but this is not guaranteed. Still, for all those of you with Nexus devices, this may come in handy at some point. As I am writing this, a build for the beta package is ongoing. So, why not give it a try after it’s done?

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